fbpx

Blog Page

Uncategorized

Engineering Features: Matt Mrazik '20: Concentrating on game design | College of Engineering – UMass Dartmouth

Matt’s game for visually impaired individuals highlights a novel approach to accessibility in game development
Video games have grown from a novelty of entertainment into one of the largest media industries in the world. During the social distancing phase of the pandemic, gaming became an important aspect of art, entertainment, and mental stimulation in people’s lives.
Matt Mrazik, who recently earned his BS degree in computer science with a minor in computer game design at the College of Engineering, says he’s always been interested in games. “Growing up I wanted to know what went into creating them. I was also always interested in math and computer science so it was a natural fit for me to be interested in game development as a career option.”
“I was always interested in math and computer science so it was a natural fit for me to be interested in game development as a career option.”
More recently, accessibility options have entered a mainstream role in the gaming industry. But, for blind players or players with significant visual impairment, the benefits that video games can bring are largely out of reach. “While audio-based games are available to them, these are far from mainstream,” Matt says.
As part of a research project guided by Firas Khatib, associate professor of Computer and Information Science at the College of Engineering, Matt developed a new game titled Feel the Rhythm, which opens some possibilities for the future state of accessibility in the gaming industry.
“Feel the Rhythm introduces a novel accessibility-driven game development process and presents this new game in the rhythm genre developed using this process to implement blind-accessible features,” he says. “It may also serve as a blueprint for how a higher budgeted game could implement similar accessibility options if developed using a similar method.”
Since developing the game, Matt has shared it with the online visually impaired gaming community. “It’s a prototype and still needs work if I want to actually release it. But those with visual impairments who have tested it have largely given me very encouraging feedback.” Matt is currently working at WB Games Boston as a Games Systems Engineer. He is also completing his master’s degree in computer science at UMassD.
“I was always interested in math and computer science so it was a natural fit for me to be interested in game development as a career option.”
The creation of computer games involves science, technology, and art.
With UMass Dartmouth’s concentration in computer game design, you’ll explore a variety of software technologies relevant to games including programming languages, scripting languages, networks, simulation engines, and multimedia design systems.
The award led by Dr. Tracie Ferreira will provide $900,000 in scholarships to prepare graduate students to excel as skilled leaders in entrepreneurship, technology, and innovation in an effort to build the South Coast’s blue economy.
Award supports Seyed-Aghazadeh’s research efforts in the area of fluid dynamics, shedding light on the fundamentals of fluid-structure-surface interactions in underwater flexible bodies, including near-surface arrays of energy harvesters and underwater soft robots.
A return to campus brought UMass Dartmouth together to achieve new heights
myUMassD is our web portal, a central location for email, notifications, services, and COIN: Corsairs Online Information.
Log in
Visit us from anywhere, at any time.
Take a virtual tour of the UMass Dartmouth campus.
University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
© 2021 Board of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts

source

× How can I help you?